PEOPLE :: FACULTY

Amitay, Michael

Director, Flow Control

Michael Amitay is a Professor of Aerospace Engineering and the Director and Founder of the new Center for Flow Physics and Control (CeFPaC) at RPI.  He received his B.Sc. (1987), M.Sc. (1990) and D.Sc. (1994) from the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel.  He was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Arizona (1994-1996) working on active control of heat transfer from heated/cooled surfaces.  From 1996-2003 he held several positions at Georgia Tech Research Institute (Aerospace, Transportation, and Advanced Systems Lab) and at Georgia Institute of Technology (School of Mechanical Engineering).  He is at RPI since June 2003.

He is an Associate Fellow of AIAA.  Prof. Amitay has over 85 journal and conference publications and three book chapters, and two U.S. patents.  Three of his conference papers were awarded “best technical paper” in 2000 by the ASME and in 2001 and 2002 by the AIAA. His current research interests are in the field of active flow control with applications in aerodynamics for Aerial and Underwater Vehicles, performance enhancement of wind turbines, building integrated wind, and heat transfer control. In addition, Prof. Amitay has been applying flow control to two-phase flows (particle-laden jets, sprays, and bubbly flows in micro-channels).

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Bevilacqua, Riccardo

Modeling and Control

Dr. Bevilacqua’s research interests focus on Guidance, Navigation and Control of multiple spacecraft systems and multiple robot systems.
His work involves theoretical investigation, numerical simulation and hardware in the loop laboratory experimentation.

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Dyson, Anna

Director, CASE

Anna Helen Dyson is Professor of Architectural Design, Theory and Technology. She is the Director of the Center of Architecture Science and Ecology (CASE), an entity spanning several institutional collaborators, and co-hosted by Skidmore Owings and Merrill (SOM) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The mission of CASE is to create an exceptional context for translational research focusing on the innovation of disruptive building technologies. CASE is collaborating with several industrial partners on next generation environmental control systems development and their demonstration and deployment on several building projects worldwide.

Through CASE, Dyson is directing interdisciplinary research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the New York State Foundation for Science, Technology and Innovation to develop new building systems that integrate applications of emerging technology from diverse research fields. CASE is committed to creating a bridge between multiple fields by proposing a new collaborative model for building research that straddles interdisciplinary technological innovation concurrent with building and development practices. The consortium attempts to achieve this without the schism that has typically divorced building science pursuits from the aesthetic, social aspirations of architectural design, which, for the consortium participants, remain inseparable from the quest for technological innovation.

Dyson has worked as a design architect and product designer in internationally recognized practices in Canada, Europe, and the United States. She has won several international design awards for her work and holds multiple international patents for building systems for on-site energy generation.

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Herron, Isom

Hydrodynamic Stability

Professor Isom Herron’s recent research interests are the problems of flow in microchannels, microtubes  and between rotating cylinders where the length scales are such that the continuum limit is barely reached. When this occurs, slip boundary conditions may be used instead of the more conventional no-slip ones.

The  current importance of the analysis of annular flows have been demonstrated in the number of applications of this regime such as MEMS technologies. The Navier-slip conditions become relevant in certain applications related to hemodynamics, high-altitude flows, and micro-scale flows. Given the recent interest in micro-scale flows, it is timely to investigate the classical stability problems (the cylindrical Couette flow being one) to address the effect of slip conditions.

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Letchford, Chris

Wind Engineering

Professor Chris Letchford’s research work has largely focused on physical modeling of extreme winds and their impact on the built environment. Beginning in the large Boundary layer Wind Tunnel at Oxford University and the study of pneumatic averaging systems, he went on to establish wind engineering research at the University of Queensland focusing on wind loading of low rise structures and particularly the correlation and distribution of fluctuating loads on canopy and cantilever roofs. Much of this work ended up in the Australian Wind Load Code – AS1170. For 8 years Chris was a member of the Wind Science and Engineering Center at Texas Tech University.

There he focused on the development of thunderstorm downburst and tornado simulations for building aerodynamic studies. Integration of full scale measurements from field campaigns on land and sea complemented this work and aided in more realistic physical modeling of these extreme wind fields. Currently Chis is involved in NYSDOT funded research on the aeroelastic response of slender structures and in the topographic effects of wind on wind turbine siting. Additional interests included extending fluidic modification of flow fields to reduced wind-structure interaction and the flow over waves and other compliant surfaces.

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Mishra, Sandipan

Modeling and Control

Professor Sandipan Mishra’s research interests are in the general area of Control and Dynamical Systems. His current research projects include of system theoretical analysis and feedback design techniques for nano-/micro-scale manufacturing, high-speed adaptive optics systems, and energy-efficient buildings. Professor Mishra’s research in the CeFPaC is targeted towards control-oriented modeling, optimal sensor location, learning feed-forward design, and distributed feedback control of active-flow control systems in building ventilation systems.


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Peles, Yoav

 

Micro Fluids and Heat Transfer

 

Professor Yoav Peles of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY is a researcher and an educator specializing in heat and fluid flow processes at the micro scale with special emphasis on two-phase flow. He has been studying flow boiling processes in microchannels for more than fifteen years and published numerous archival and conference papers on the topic. His pioneered research on flow boiling instabilities in microchannels is frequently cited by his expert peers.

Dr. Peles received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology in 1999. Following he joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to work on the Micro Engine Project. He joined the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering at RPI in 2002 and was promoted to the rank of full professor in 2011. Professor Peles received several distinguished awards and he is the recipient of the 2005 ONR Young Investigator Award and the 2007 DARPA/MTO Young Faculty Award.

His research interest is in the field of heat transfer, energy systems, and fluid mechanics primarily at the micro and nano scales. This research endeavor seeks to extend fundamental knowledge of thermal-hydraulic mechanisms governing adiabatic and diabatic single-phase and two-phase flows in diminishing length scales.

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Sahni, Onkar

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Dr. Sahni’s research interests span modeling and simulation of coupled fluid flow problems. His research is focused on development and application of simulation-based predictive tools for fluid flow problems involving turbulence and flow control. His research also puts emphasis on adaptive methods, extreme-scale computing and uncertainty quantification. In current and past research projects he has applied simulation-based tools in various real-world application areas including aerodynamics, cardiovascular flows, re-melting processes, two-phase fluid flows, and wind turbines.

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Shephard, Mark

Numerical Methods

Mark S. Shephard is the Samuel A. and Elisabeth C. Johnson, Jr. Professor of Engineering, and the director of the Scientific Computation Research Center.  Shephard develops technologies to improve the reliability and level of automation of advanced numerical simulations including active flow control simulation.  Specific areas of development include automatic mesh generation, automated and adaptive analysis methods, multiscale simulation methods and parallel adaptive simulation technologies.

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Vollen, Jason

Architecture

Jason Oliver Vollen is a Registered Architect and researcher focused on emerging material technologies, specifically, the integration of energy per-formative structural ceramics, dynamic and environmental simulation, active flow control for energy harvesting, thermal transfer, and ventilation efficiency.

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Wen, John

Modeling and Control

John Wen is a Professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer, & Systems Engineering, with a joint appointment in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, & Nuclear Engineering.  He is  also the Director of Center for Automation Technologies and Systems (CATS), a New York State designated Center for Advanced Technology.  His research interest is related to the modeling and control of complex dynamical systems, with applications to precision motion, robot manipulation, active optics, thermal management, and active flow control.  In the active flow control area, his focus is on the generation and iterative refinement of reduced order model (ROM) based on flow field trajectories and the use of ROM for estimator and controller design.  Dr. Wen is a Fellow of IEEE.

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Zhang, Lucy

Computational Fluid Dynamics

My research is on developing novel numerical techniques for computational fluid dynamics, computation simulations of fluid-structure interactions and multiphase flows. These techniques are then been utilized to study and analyze physical behaviors in aerospace and biomedical applications.

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